Publications

Posted 14-11-2012
A study of crisis intervention and planned family support with vulnerable families

Author: Professor Karen Healy, University of Queensland, December 2011

This report focuses on the experiences of 88 families and their children who were homeless or at risk of homelessness. It explores their challenges and how services can best assist them and others in their situation. 

A national homelessness research project funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services.

Posted 14-11-2012
Emerging Solutions: Family Homelessness Research

This set of fact sheets, published in 2012, addresses the key issues coming out of the above study of crisis intervention and planned family support.

The fact sheets provide information on the key challenges for the families, and strategies for service providers to meet these challenges, in the following areas:

Posted 16-05-2012
Queer without Fear – LGBTI Domestic and Family violence and its Impacts

Domestic and family violence occurs at similar rates in the LGBTIQ community as it does in the broader community, but is hidden. This resource aims to assist both community members experiencing domestic and family violence as well as the people who are supporting them. Published in 2012.

If you would like a free copy of the resource please contact the Brisbane Domestic Violence Service on (07) 3217 2544.

Posted 28-07-2011
Lives of Uncommon Children: Reflections of Forgotten Australians

Authors: Karyn Walsh, Kris Olsson 2009

Ten years after the Forde Inquiry into the abuse of children in state care, the Federal Government finally issued a public apology to the ‘Forgotten Australians’ in November, 2009.

This book records the stories, the memories and observations of some of these children. Now adults, they are making their way in a world which has, until recently, barely acknowledged the pain and cruelty that marked their childhoods.

For more information on support for adults who experienced childhood abuse in an institutional setting, please visit our dedicated website Lotus Place.

Posted 02-03-2011
Social inclusion in Australia: How Australia is faring, 2nd Edition

The 2012 report highlights that while we’re a thriving prosperous nation with high rates of employment, good health and high educational attainment, there are still people who are at risk of being left behind. In particular, around 5% (or 640,000) of working age Australians continue to experience multiple and entrenched disadvantage and income inequality has grown steadily since the mid-1990s.

To view the reports, visit the Australian Social Inclusion Board (ASIB) website.

Posted 01-11-2010
Homefront Evaluation Report

Micah Projects requested Housing Innovations to review and evaluate the Homefront Program to inform ongoing program development. 

The Homefront Program provides support to people with disabilities, including psychiatric disabilities, to enjoy a quality of life and to sustain their tenancies in homes located throughout the Brisbane area. 

This report describes the methods used for the evaluation, the Homefront Program, findings and recommendations for ongoing program development. 

Posted 01-11-2008
Riverside Drive to Home Report

Authors: Helen Wallace, Jon Eastgate, Judith Hunter, 2008

An evaluation of Riverside Drive short term collaborative project between Micah Projects, Brisbane City Council and Queensland Government Department of Communities.

This evaluation was undertaken to inform Micah Projects reflections on our work practices with people experiencing homelessness in the context of a hot spot. It is based on interviews with people experiencing homelessness, Micah Projects Street to Home workers and the Mater Community Clinical Nurse based at the Brisbane Homelessness Service Centre. The evaluation was funded by Micah Projects.

The following information outlines what took place between April 2008 and July 2008 in relation to relocating 58 people from Riverside Drive, South Brisbane who were experiencing homelessness.

To summarise, Micah Projects, through its Street to Home service, worked closely with most of these people who were advised that the Queensland Police Service would be exercising 'Move On' powers and the site cleared by Brisbane City Council. 

The Street to Home team engaged intensely at the site and then increasingly with individuals and household groups in a range of locations across Brisbane. Police also had a constant presence at Riverside Drive. The Mater Health Services Community Clinical Nurse worked closely with three individuals who had serious health problems and injuries.

The majority of people at Riverside Drive expressed anger, even rage about the situation. Dealing with this was very challenging for workers, especially the front line Assessment and Referral and Street to Home teams at the Brisbane Homelessness Service Centre.

By the 25 July, after four months of focused effort, homeless people were not living at the Riverside Drive area and of the 58 people Street to Home had worked with:

  • 26 people were in temporary accommodation
  • 15 people were in long term housing
  • 14 people left without requesting or accepting assistance and were not in contact
  • 3 people were still homeless and in regular contact with Street to Home.
Posted 01-07-2008
Journeys through Homelessness – Whose Evidence?

Authors: Carolyn Mason and Walter Robb, 2008

This project reviews the current homelessness service system, particularly in the greater Brisbane region. It uses the evidence base of the practical implementation knowledge of people and their service providers to map the pathways through homelessness or being at risk of homelessness. This knowledge was obtained using a case study approach.

While the project was limited to three case studies, they are representative of people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, and were from three different service areas of Micah Projects.

The pathway analysis provides specific insights into the homelessness service system from the knowledge generated about how responses are working in practice.

Posted 27-06-2008
Voices from the Margins - Green Paper Submission

A submission to the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

This submission to the Green Paper: Voices from the Margins includes the responses of people who have experienced homelessness. A decision was made to include as much raw data as possible so that a broad range of voices could be heard.

Our hope is that this response, Voices from the Margins, provides a broad range of responses to the Green Paper from people who have directly experienced homelessness, as well as input from practitioners who provide direct support to people.

Posted 01-05-2008
Voices from the Margins – A Snapshot

Author: Dr Annie Holden, 2008

To continuously improve services and understand how we can develop more focused early intervention responses for people experiencing chronic homelessness, a survey was commissioned by Micah Projects to provide data on barriers to housing this group. In all thirty one people were surveyed.