Partnerships and Consortia

Micah Projects collaborations with leading community and health service providers and partnerships with government

  • + - Inclusive Health

    The Inclusive Health Partnerships program is an integrated, person-centred, trauma-sensitive and sustainable response to the health needs of vulnerable Brisbane people, including people experiencing homelessness.

    For all information please visit the dedicated Inclusive Health section of this website.

  • + - 500 Lives 500 Homes

    The 500 Lives 500 Homes campaign is a three year campaign, which commenced in March 2014.

    Inspecter speaking at a gathering

    Acting Inspector Corey Allen speaking at the 500 Lives 500 Homes Community Forum, April 2014

    The campaign comprises 34 government and non-government partners who, along with other supporting organisations, are working collaboratively to bring an end to homelessness in our city for as many individuals and families as possible. Micah Projects is the lead agency in the campaign.

    The 500 Lives 500 Homes campaign is on track to achieve its goal of housing 500 individuals and families by 2017. As at February 2016, 332 households had been housed through this collective effort.

    Community members and businesses have contributed over $30,000 to assist people being housed to set up their homes. Non-government organisations across the homelessness sector have contributed over $15,000 toward delivering the campaign. 

    The campaign highlights the need for greater supply of affordable housing plus the continuum of services required to end homelessness with individuals and families. 

    To find out more about the 500 Lives 500 Homes campaign please visit the dedicated website.

    You may like to consider donating a welcome pack of essential household items for an individual or family moving from homelessness.

    Donations are always appreciated and those over $2 are tax deductible.

  • + - Family Inclusion Network

    The Family Inclusion Network (FIN) is a representative group of practitioners, academics and parents with children in care, seeking to progress practice and policy with the statutory child protection system. 

    Areas of interest include the design, implementation and evaluation of family support, child protection and community services.

    The FIN program was established in Brisbane in 2004 and is auspiced by Micah Projects. The program has since been developed in other Australian states and territories.

    FIN provide parents and family members with information, support and advocacy. FIN Brisbane has aligned with the government’s agenda to promote family inclusion within child protection services. FIN works with government, groups and community organisations, to ensure parents and family members’ voices, contribute to the development of family inclusive practices recommended through the Carmody Reforms

    Visit the Family Inclusion Network Website

  • + - Partners in Recovery

    Micah Projects is part of a consortium of service providers who deliver the Partners in Recovery (PIR) program, supporting individuals with complex needs and severe and persistent mental illness.  

    For more information please visit the PIR webpage in our services section.

  • + - Brisbane Common Ground

    Brisbane Common Ground at 15 Hope Street, South Brisbane brings together the right ingredients to help tenants make a home. 

    It is affordable, with rent based on a percentage of income. Tenants have the stability of a General Tenancy Agreement and can live in Brisbane Common Ground (BCG) for as long as they meet the terms of the agreement and it remains the housing of their choice.

    Each unit is self contained, fully furnished, and meets the Queensland Government’s universal design principles. Everywhere in BCG is wheelchair accessible, with 33 adaptable units meeting the standards detailed in AS4299.

    The building features a range of common areas that help to create small neighbourhoods and provide places where tenants can relax and socialise as a community. Special purpose spaces provide opportunities for activities and recreation.

    Brisbane Common Ground is an asset to the local community with retail/commercial spaces and a function room and meeting/board room spaces for hire.

    Building image of Brisbane Common Ground, Hope Street, South Brisbane

    Brisbane Common Ground, Hope Street, South Brisbane. Photography: Katie Bennett.

    Ongoing delivery of BCG is the responsibility of Supportive Housing Partners, Common Ground Queensland and Micah Projects. Common Ground Queensland provides the tenancy and property management and Micah Projects provides support services to tenants who require it. Both community organisations have been strongly involved in the development and implementation of the building.

    The principles of Supportive Housing at BCG are:

    • Design: Designing or renovating buildings thoughtfully to create a dignified and positive home environment and including in the design community spaces that can be utilised by tenants and the wider community.
    • Permanency and Affordability: Housing is permanent, affordable, and self-contained with rent less than 30% of income.
    • Tenancy Mix: There is a mix of tenants with half being people who have experienced homelessness and half people who have never been homeless. This mix helps ensure a vibrant community and a diversity of tenants.
    • Safety: A concierge service is provided 24/7 to ensure a welcoming but controlled access to the building at all times.
    • Support Services: On site supports including holistic case management, mental health, primary healthcare, recreation and other specialist services to prevent people becoming homeless again and to support people to achieve their goals and aspirations.
    • Social inclusion: Each element of supportive housing from building to support service design aims to create the greatest degree of empowerment and independence for people, as well as a thriving community for tenants and neighbours.
    How you can help

    You may like to consider donating a welcome pack of essential household items for one person moving into Brisbane Common Ground. 

    Rachelle

    Rachelle, a former Brisbane Common Ground tenant, came to Australia as a 14-year-old refugee and was determined to make a life for herself here in Australia. Photography: Craig Holmes.

    Read Rachelle's story.

    Read Heather's story.

    The building was delivered through a pioneering government-business-community partnership.

    Funding for the land purchase, design, construction and support services was provided by the Australian and Queensland governments through the National Building Economic Stimulus Plan and the COAG National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness. This is the third Common Ground project that Grocon Constructors completed at cost, with no profit or margin.

    Australian Common Ground Alliance

    Micah Projects is a founding member of the Australian Common Ground Alliance (ACGA), a network of organisations working in partnership with government, corporate, philanthropic and community stakeholders to promote and deliver innovative supportive housing solutions for chronic homelessness.

    For more information please contact us.

  • + - Hope Street Cafe

    The Hope Street Café is Micah Projects’ first social enterprise project. The café space provides for community and culture, training and employment, and events and exhibitions.  

    The Café is a not-for-profit business connecting the community with people who have been excluded from the workforce, advocating for local food production and a diverse, inclusive local neighbourhood.  

    201702 Hope St Cafe Jamie

    Jamie, participant at Hope Street Café on Boundary.

    Micah Projects is currently seeking volunteer expressions of interest, from people who are experienced or interested in social enterprise, small business, hospitality and marketing, and devoted to good food.

    Visit the Hope Street Café website.

    For more information please contact us.

  • + - Brisbane Partnerships

    Brisbane Partnerships - Giving a Voice to Vulnerable Families is a three-year collaborative project funded by the Australian Department of Social Services.

    Until mid-2017 the Partnership will be coordinating activities in a number of important areas to promote social change at both the community and system level. 

    The Partnership is built on long-standing relationships among Brisbane community-based multi-service providers Community Living Association, Jabiru, Kyabra and Micah Projects. We are committed to a community development approach, early intervention and family support within a social justice framework. 

    What we do

    The aims of the Brisbane Partnerships in relation to the Giving a Voice to Vulnerable Families project are to:

    • give parents, children and young people experiencing disadvantage and/or vulnerability opportunities to participate in the design and delivery of early intervention and prevention services 
    • build the capacity of families to engage with local community and self-help processes, including local and wider advocacy for change that would affect their lives
    • give families a greater voice in influencing the shape of future social policies about community and self-help forms of early intervention and prevention
    • collaborate with the Family Inclusion Network in South East Queensland (FIN SEQ) to strengthen engagement of parents in all facets of child and family support for those facing challenges in the Child Protection system. 

      2016 Plti Graduates

      Graduates from the inaugural Parent Leadership Training Institute (PLTI) course in Queensland, December 2016. Photography: Craig Holmes.

    Achievements to date

    • Conducted Parent Cafés and documented the voices of parents talking about what they need to achieve the best for their children.
    • Parents as Teachers – trained staff from partner organisations to facilitate the curriculum and approach to working with families within the context of other program or service delivery structures.
    • Parents as Advocates – resourced and contributed to a Parent Leadership Training course which enables parents who wish to improve the lifelong health, safety and learning for their children, become advocates for children. Brisbane Partnerships continues to support parents who participated in this course which includes providing guidance to parents as they develop and implement their community project.
    • Convened forums and jointly advocated for people with complex needs about how the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) should support them.
    • Successfully tendered for and continue to conduct the Brisbane Emergency Response Outreach Service (BEROS) for children of families in the child protection system.
    • Researched and published three major reports:

    Other reports and websites 

    For more information about best practice Parent Engagement view:

    Brisbane Partnerships member organisations

    Community Living Association
    Community Living Association (CLA) is a not-for-profit community organisation based in Nundah. Its focus is on supporting people with intellectual and cognitive disabilities and young people at risk to get the most from their lives.

    Jabiru Community Youth and Children’s Services Association
    Jabiru Youth and Children’s Services Association is a community-based, non-profit organisation committed to providing community services and support for children, young people, and families in Brisbane’s northern suburbs.

    Kyabra Community Association
    Kyabra Community Association is a medium sized multi-service organisation based in Sunnybank which works with families and communities to strengthen family and community life.

    Micah Projects
    Micah Projects is a community based not-for-profit organisation with a vision to create justice and respond to injustice at the personal, social and structural levels in church, government, business and society.  Micah Projects provides a range of housing, health and safety support and advocacy services to individuals and families.

    Please contact us for more information.
    Collaboration Hub, Level 1, 209 Boundary Street, West End Q 4101
    collaboration@micahprojects.org.au
    Phone   07 3029 7067
    Fax  07 3029 7029    

  • + - Brisbane Emergency Response Outreach Service

    Brisbane Emergency Response Outreach Service (BEROS) provides outreach and support for young people aged 12-18 who are in care of Child Safety and are self-placing.

    Community Living Association is the lead agency supporting young people to achieve safety and stability in their housing and relationships with family, friends, culture and community.

    Kyabra supports young people with access to emergency overnight accommodation.

    Micah Projects provides transport to safe and appropriate accommodation for young people in crisis and after-hours outreach support to young people in the community.

    Contact us on (07) 3036 4444 or email youthemergency@micahprojects.org.au

    Together with young people we aim to address crisis by connecting with resources and people to create safety and stability as quickly as possible.

    View BEROS brochure.

  • + - Jane Street Garden

    Jane Street Community Garden in West End, is a not-for-profit community organisation. Micah Projects provides coordination and administrative support for the garden.

    2015 Jane St Garden

    Jane Street Community Garden Coordinator Melissa Smrecnik and Garden Volunteer Chris Strohfeldt tending the garden on a sunny winter’s day. Photographer: Craig Holmes.

    The Community Garden is dedicated to nurturing sustainable living in a city environment. The garden provides an opportunity for people to become involved in organic gardening and permaculture through volunteering and/or financial contribution.

    Micah Projects, especially The Hive team, supports people to participate in garden activities.

    The garden has been operating for 10 years and grows around 200 varieties of organically-grown edible plants. 

    Reclink Australia is another partner supporting the aims of the Jane Street Community Garden.

    To find out more about the garden please visit their dedicated website.

  • + - 50 Lives 50 Homes

    A campaign to house and support people who are homeless in Brisbane. 

    As at 31 December 2013
    A total of 701 people had been surveyed with the Vulnerability Index about their housing, healthcare and support service needs. 230 people had been housed by the 50 Lives 50 Homes campaign partners.

    A new campaign 500 Lives 500 Homes began with a community-wide registry from Monday 24 March – Friday 4 April 2014. It is a three year campaign to break the cycle of homelessness for families, young people and adults in our community who are homeless or vulnerably housed.

    Link to 500 Lives 500 Homes website.

    50 Lives 50 Homes - the beginning

    The 50 Lives 50 Homes campaign to house and support Brisbane’s vulnerable people experiencing homelessness was launched in June 2010. Micah Projects is committed to meeting the targets set by government to reduce overall homelessness by half and offer housing to all people who sleep rough by 2020. Our colleagues at Common Ground (now known as Breaking Ground) in the USA developed a targeted outreach strategy for the first stage of this work: creating a register of all people who are sleeping rough and prioritising those whose health is most at risk by remaining homeless. Starting with the people who are most entrenched in homelessness made sense and we decided to set achievable targets of housing fifty people at a time, or ‘bite size chunks’, as Becky Kanis from Common Ground Los Angeles would say.

    A person completing a survey during 50 Lives 50 Homes registry week in June 2010.

    Completing the Vulnerability Index survey during 50 Lives 50 Homes registry week in June 2010. Photography: Patrick Hamilton.

    Common Ground developed a tool called the Vulnerability Index, based on research by Dr Jim O’Connell from the Boston Health Care for the Homeless program into the key mortality risk indicators that are prevalent in people who experience long term homelessness. As well as collecting the name and age of homeless individuals and their health status, the Index captures data on their institutional history (prison, hospital, military, etc.), length of homelessness, crisis accommodation use and previous housing situation. 

    During the week of 7 June, 2010 Micah Projects support and advocacy workers were joined by outreach workers from other agencies and scores of community volunteers to administer the surveys. We went out at 4am in a methodical canvassing of places where people sleep rough in order to meet people before they left the space for the day. Respondents who consented were photographed where they slept for future identification which aids in guaranteeing consistency among teams of outreach workers. Once the data was collected, it was entered into a database and people were then ranked according to their age and prevalence of health indicators. This informed the decision making process when matching available resources in housing and support services to an individual’s need.

    50 Lives 50 Homes volunteers on the streets before dawn, June 2010.

    50 Lives 50 Homes volunteers on the streets before dawn, June 2010.

    The results of the survey were astounding and demonstrated the high degree of disability and the incredible length of time spent homeless by the people we met: one man had been homeless for 40 years. Half of the people surveyed were found to be ‘vulnerable’, meaning they had been homeless for over 6 months and had at least one of eight major health risk indicators, such as end-stage renal disease and multiple recent hospitalisations. These results provided the information necessary for planning the housing and support needs of each individual.

    The Registry Week culminated in the Homeless to Home Healthcare Forum where healthcare professionals from all over Australia shared their work with vulnerable people experiencing homelessness. The Forum launched a Network of healthcare professionals and organisations with the intention of advancing strategies aimed at meeting the healthcare needs of vulnerable homeless and formerly homeless adults across Brisbane. We were joined at the Forum (and throughout the week) by Dr Jim O’Connell, Becky Kanis and Beth Sandor from Common Ground LA. Their time, energy and expertise were invaluable to this process and they continued to stay in touch with the campaign.

    Premier Anna Bligh addressing a Forum

    Premier Anna Bligh addressing the Homeless to Home Healthcare Forum, June 2010. Photography: Robyn McDonald.

    50 Lives 50 Homes would not have been possible without our partnership with Mater Health Services and the generosity of the Mater Foundation as well as almost 100 volunteers and the parents, students and teachers of All Hallows’ School (who provided a home base and breakfast for volunteers). The next three years were very busy as we worked our way through the register, housing and supporting people and coordinating services that assisted people to maintain their tenancies. With our partners we felt great satisfaction to reach our target of housing 50 vulnerable individuals and families and then move beyond the target.

    As at 31 December 2013 a total of 701 people had been surveyed with the Vulnerability Index about their housing, healthcare and support service needs. 230 people had been housed by the 50 Lives 50 Homes campaign partners. View 50 Lives 50 Homes brochure.

    Article by Daryl Passmore Courier Mail 26 Feb 2011

    Senator Claire Moore's address to the Australian Senate 2010

    With our partners we began a new campaign 500 Lives 500 Homes with a community-wide registry from Monday 24 March – Friday 4 April 2014.